Current time: 01-17-2018, 07:06 AM

Hello There, Guest! Register
facebook
Instagram
Eddles

National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
#31
riprap Wrote:Herewith a snippet from someone in the know and involved in the inlands fishery policy making decisions:

"1b management programme means that a national strategy will be developed for MANAGEMENT. Control does not equal eradication but rather control in areas of biodiversity concern AND a permit has always been necessary for stocking. So the doom prognosis is a bit misguided. Anyway will keep you up to speed re developments."

So the DOOM and GLOOM prognosis was accurate. The way things stand now, it's the end of public access to Trout fishing in the Western Cape. All the CPS controlled fly fishing waters are in Provincial Nature reserves with "bio-diverse importance". What ever happened to the Freshwater Angling Forum chaired by Dean Impson of Cape Nature? This forum was intended for ALL facets of Freshwater Angling to make themselves heard. (the next meeting is a year overdue). A "workshop" on creating a "Policy for the utilization of Alien Invasive Fish Species" will take place on the 2nd of April 2014 at Jonkershoek.

I know several clubs, individuals and businesses which rely on fishing are preparing written submissions to the minister. I think if you love your sport/recreational fishing you should too. My 2c.
Reply
BWG
#32
Early reports seem to indicate that the Trout guys have managed to Nuke NEMBA.
The fourth attempt by the Department of Environmental Affairs to list invasive species has to go back to the drawing boards. The consultation process will have to start from scratch. [According to FOSAF] :eusa_clap:
Reply
#33
This Department headed by the Current Minister and her ACTING heads is notorious for not following due procedure so this comes as no surprize if it happens.......
Please keep us informed.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#34
You said it...... The Department of Environmental Affairs has admitted botching the invasive species notices and regulations so has extended the comment period by a month. (of which 1 week has already elapsed) This contravenes the conditions of NEMBA. (source Ian Cox)
Reply
#35
CapeNature is close to finalising its Indigenous Freshwater Fish Utilisation Policy and will soon commence with developing an Alien Freshwater Fish Utilisation Policy. Among the key objectives of these policies is to address the issue of alien/indigenous fish translocations between water bodies in the Western Cape and the risks this poses to indigenous fish populations. Workshop will be held in April.
Reply
#36
Cool thanks. Soon as I hear the word "talkshops", I switch off - been to too many where the decisions were already made and it was a case of just going through the motions to make the legislation about transparency look as if it works in favour of the "public opinions"!
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
BWG
#37
I hear you RipRap. I will be attending on behalf of the CPS..
Reply
#38
Good, let logic prevail please. Is organised bass angling sending a rep??
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#39
riprap Wrote:Good, let logic prevail please. Is organised bass angling sending a rep??
It seems not. I was unable to attend the meeting due to unforseen circumstances but I will be getting the minutes.

Deadline for objections is tomorrow at 4pm. Remember, this applies to ALL alien species.
http://www.flyloops.net/nemba.php
Reply
#40
Hi Riprap I wish I had discovered you earlier. It would have saved me days of work! The state of play at the moment is that the DEA are sitting on a ton of objections while facing what may very likely be a legal drubbing at the hands of the Kloof Conservancy who say that this all should have been law long ago. The Kloof Conservancy whose environmental stance makes the DEA look like a bunch of wusses share Trout SA's interpretation of the NEM:BA , namely control of invasive species means exterminate. I don't think it is arguable quite frankly but that is not really the problem. The problem is that a government department has hopelessly misunderstood the NEM:BA for ten years the road they have travelled has dwindled to a goat track and its about to go off a cliff. That is a very bad place for government to be. So while we at Trout SA are ready to take then on if they so much as go another inch down that road the real question is how do we help them get it right? And that I think requires one to go back to basics and if you do that you find that there is no policy that guides any of this. The White Paper that informed the drafting of the NEM:BA hardly mentions aquatic environments at all. Furthermore while there is a some understanding on how the relationship between ecological threats and social and economic need plays out on dry land, there is absolutely none when dealing with aquatic environments. This absurd situation where government says that there is no intention to harm and industry but the industry says that will wipe us out is not only absurd, it also demonstrates the ignorance of the officials involved. I see it in report after report. it is even in the CSIR report you alerted me to, Riprap. That report talks of balancing the economic potential with the threat but it comes from a perspective that has no comprehension of what that potential is.The fact that it is characterised in purely economic terms displays the depth of the ignorance. You cant achieve balance if you only underside one aspect of the equation and that is a big part of the problem.So I think the DEA should take the time to understand what it is they are trying to manage rather than focussing only on what they are trying to protect. And until they have that understanding they should avoid from trying to manage species that have social economic cultural or other value.That is why section 70 of the NEM:BA required them to list certain species within two years. The legislature had in mind the easy ones that don't give rise to these sorts of problems. That was of course six years ago but those sort of delays and the place they find themselves in is what happens when you misread a molehill for a mountain. That of course is the other problem. They need to understand their own Act. It is a mistake to think that the Convention on Biological Diversity applies. In SA the constitution applies and a scheme that makes human alien isn't ever going to work. Apart from ignoring every value dear to the Constitution it offends the NEMA in whose framework the NEM:BA must operate. I was at school with the the DG responsible for this law. I can tell you that he is exceptionally clever. He wasn't unaware of this problem. You can see this in the Bill which though far from perfect treated aliens very differently.But something went wrong and somehow we got a scheme which makes farming alien species criminal unless the Minister of Environmental affairs says it ok. That is just wrong. Sadly the kind of humans are bad thinking that resulted in that wrong has infected the thinking behind the implementation of the NEM:BA which has encouraged xenophobic attitudes about the other side that apart from encouraging the ignorance I mentioned earlier has also resulted in a complete misunderstanding of the definition of invasive. Useful species cant be invasive. You manage those species as alien. If those officials only realised that their goal lies in the proper management human impacts on biodiversity rather than discriminating against useful species by calling them invasive we might get back onto the highway that the NEM:BA is meant to be.
Reply
#41
Hi Ian, thanks for your correspondence. I will reply when I can apply my mind properly.....
The more things change, the more they stay the same; see this (from 1986):

[ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
BWG
#42
Perhaps some of you would be interested to participate since the trout guys are definitely leading the way and what ever decisions are ultimately taken by the policy makers will have a knock on effect in our preferred sport anyway!

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ho1FBdoWKhuFXGpVupUodmJX6qdXj287NOBvuofapEY/viewform" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;">https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ho1FBd ... Y/viewform</a><!-- m -->

The policy making procedures with NEM:BA legislation has been likened to "painting the floor with a hammer" .........by some.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#43
Dr Guy Preston from Environmental Affairs said on Morning Live this morning that to try and eradicate or remove trout, bass, carp (17 species of fish) that are alien and exist in certain waters, is an absurdity and impossible and that the main aim is of control so these species dont infiltrate new waters. NO JOBS WILL BE LOST AS A RESULT OF THE NEW PROPOSED REGS!

Well, the constitution compells them to acknowledge socio economic benefits of alien species, same for forestry and other "alien" crops.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#44
FOSAF and Trout SA
Press Release 5 August 2014
On the Minister of Environmental affairs Decision to postpone any decision to list trout as invasive pending discussions with FOSAF and Trout SA
FOSAF and Trout SA note that the Minister of Environmental Affairs has published the Lists and Regulations on Alien and Invasive Species. Rainbow trout and brown trout have not been listed at present. This is because the approach to regulating trout is still being discussed between the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), FOSAF and Trout SA.
FOSAF and Trout SA welcome the decision to postpone the listing of trout. We applaud the efforts of Government at national and provincial levels to fast-track and build an enabling environment for aquaculture as part of the National Development Plan. This has facilitated recent discussions between the DEA, FOSAF and Trout SA and other interested and affected parties, in Durban. We also welcome the opportunity to further discuss and refine the in-principle consensus regarding the AIS Regulations and trout that has emerged.
We remain committed to finding a workable and simple set of solutions aimed at achieving self-regulation and audited compliance. It is important that such a solution will address the concerns of the parties and must provide an enabling environment for a sustainable trout-based aquaculture industry together with its full value chain in South Africa.
Reply
#45
The NEMBA (National Biodiversity Management Act) regulations were published in the Government Gazette on the the 1st August and they come into effect on the 1st of October.
Besides Rainbow and brown trout being excluded for now, herewith all the applicable documents:

[ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]

[ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]

[ATTACHMENT NOT FOUND]
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)