Current time: 01-17-2018, 11:20 AM

Hello There, Guest! Register
facebook
Instagram
Eddles

Cull - slot limit

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
#1
Ok, so who let the dog's out!!

Theoretical situation:

Let's say that a well known dam has had a detailed study done on the fishery which includes bass and the resultant proposal is that a cull slot limit be introduced on the bass for a period of minimum 1 year, after which the results thereof will be compared with current and re-assessed.

What are the views of all the bunny huggers (not slippers), budding environmentalists, doomsday sayers, masters of prophecy, prophets of disaster and Joe fish?
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
BFSA
#2
Riprap,is there enough bass in the first place,figures please.

Anyway,you are the boffin here,and CBC.

A cull slot can be a good thing,providing the numbers are right.

Come Riprap,I'm a noob in this subject :blue-biggrin:
Reply
#3
pm, there are apparently certain sizes (length not age) that do not have a reliable food source to see them through the transition to becoming a big bass. Those that make the hurdle have a good chance of growing out vs. similar climates and conditions elsewhere in the world.
It would appear that fish are being released to their own detriment.
However, if I had it my way, I would put in 1400 15kg+ Nile Perch and at least 1000 monster sterile barbel to eat some of the millions of Carp which have turned the place into a "longdrop". But, I'm powerless........
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#4
Riprap why perch and doesn't barbel chow bass as well
Reply
#5
You ask why Perch?

[Image: Giant-Nile-Perch.jpg]

...because at this size it will definately be the top predator in the pond and must surely also be able to devour a few unpreferred's - apologies to the papgooiers!
You banana boys have barbel in most, if not all, of your larger impoundments and the bass fishing is hot, if this site is anything to go by??

But more seriously, if we can interevene for the better than why not, isn't that why there is science?
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#6
You know chaps and fellow bassers, there is a myriad of threads on this site about the conservation of bass for their own good, since we introduced them and we impound them expecting them to manage themselves whilst we bitch about poor fishing, hook n cook, poor livewell management and the likes and here we have a thread which talks about killing bass to ensure happier, healthier, bigger fish for all.
All of a sudden there are many views but few viewpoints and I personally think that we talk too much and act too little as regards this limited resource of ours. We have guys talking about giving certain waters a break cos they have been hammered for the last few years etc yet what we fail to recognise is that the hammering comes from us ourselves and many "wise" contributors here have often mentioned how stewing our fish for hours in the livewell is not honorary to the fish themselves yet ons moer voort!!

We need an accepted pragmatic, logical, scientific approach towards our fish resources in this water scarce country and that includes all facets of the sport whether it is moggel, trout, bass, carp or even golden trout. We can create hybrids and we can genetically modify or enhance our fish but we cannot stop the ever increasing hunger pains of the unemployed masses nor can we halt the wanton destruction of our waterways by pollution and effluent! These influences are politically orientated and this is not a political site (except for those okes in the Cape of Storms maybe?).

So, where does that leave us? Manage the environment and the multitude of introduced species to the best of our abilities knowing full well that legislation, misinformed anglers, wannabes (as Bergie refers to us) and the like can make a difference if we just put the effort in. This whole catch and release catchy type of stuff is what our forefathers should have thought of, we now need a different and modern approach.

Think about it?
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
BFSA
#7
The key to a good fishery is balance.

From the plant\algie in the water to the baitfish that eat it, to the bass that eat the baitfish.

Here is my view of what can help our Cape waters become more balanced. We lack good aquatic plants in our dams. Up north the climate allows for rappid growth of plants and a better fishery is the result. The dams also cope better with polution, than a more barron plantless type of dam. Also if a dam never overflows flushing toxins\polution out each rainy season, then toxins build up. Plants can help reduce the phosphate levels creating and maintaining healthy a water balance. The benifits are obvious... Compare all the cape waters and the better ones have plants, are continually flushed, and have a better overall balance. The murcky waters are obviously not good plant growing areas as no light can penitrait the water. Thanks Mr Carp. :blue-sad:

Take theewaters for Example. Not many plants to speak of and with rapidly receeding water levels the plants don't get a chance to flourish. Leaving a barron bare enviroment with little fodder for bass.

We all know that alien aquatic plants are a huge problem and a potential disater if introduced but surely the experts will be able find a solution here.
Life is to short, live it, fish it, play it!
Reply
#8
Ian, the problem with the experts is that they are all in the private sector and very few are in the state departments where the decisions are made and legislation is enacted.
Look at how the proposed inland fisheries policy keeps getting bungled.

Ok, so let's assume that within the next few light years, this policy sees the light of day and is actually useful or is a waste of gazette paper. Then we can only start to regionally form management tools to manage our waters for the fish as well.

If the powers that be only realised the huge economic impact that our sport has, they would be falling over each other to manage our waters for more and bigger fish so that we would pay our taxes willingly in exchange for services rendered.

You guys in the Cape have it difficult with water plants and your fluctuating water levels but YES, plants are an absolute necessity.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#9
It would appear that the biggest hurdle here is the mindset of the anglers themselves!

100 Years ago SA had much less wild game than today due to disease, wanton overhunting, etc. Why is the situation reversed now? Mindset.......

Once us puny humans realised the value of the animals we were destroying we started to conserve them and the genetics that remained. Now there are more animals then ever before and prices for top genetics are absolutely mind boggling. In the end these same animals are killed, yes you read correctly, KILLED, and that's where the value lies and why they are managed sustainably. Hunters like fishermen can be thanked for what we have today.

Until we actually manage our bass resources, the situation won't improve. It's a pity that our mates in the carp game are not thinking like this (please tell me if they are??) because and like elsewhere in the world, the Carp are becoming more of a dominant linked to negative force in our dams!
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#10
Guys, I need your help. What would you imagine must be critical guidelines for the utilisation of removed fish bearing in mind that you cannot move the fish to another water as that would be illegal?
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#11
This slot limit,over a measured period,is something that will always benefit what is left behind in the water as there is only so much food to feed bass (and other predators such as barbel,cormorants and locals who harvest to eat).If the volume of fish feeding on the bait is reduced,needless to say,there is more food for those left behind,and with that,those remaining have the chance to grow bigger...the up side is your chance of catching bigger fish and challenge August's new record and the down side is you are likely to catch fewer fish as the volume of dinks has been thinned out...Quantity versus quality and most seasoned /serious bass anglers would have the option of catching fewer larger fish rather than pulling tons of 300 grammers and tearing your baits to pieces with no decent result.Rip,you are right in saying the introduction of bass to our systems has to be monitored,firstly,as it was an exotic introduction and certain pressures have evolved...predation,water conditions,growing of the sport,reduced fodder population and a host of other things,yet,just like August has recently proved by catching a new SA Record,the potential to raise that quality of fish is still alive and well.With a lake like Wriggleswade,condition of late have changed dramatically,one factor being the clarity of the water,but good quality bass can survive (and even thrive) in this condition,however,the food source may be taking strain.It would make good sense to set up a limit of continuous harvest for a period of time and that harvest be given to someone who would consume the fish.It is a way the lakes in the States have been managed for decades...we would have to have that same kind of intervention,from the Angling fraternity,because there is NO chance that this type of implimentation and monitoring will have any Government assistance...and besides,I am sure that we as the Anglers are sufficiently knowledgeable and motivated to install such slot limits for the better of the sport...like you say,it is the hunting and angling fraternity that is for the conservation of the sports.Having a competition on Wriggleswade,for example,and I merely make mention of this dam for the sake of using a venue,should hold a tournament that removes fish of a certain size or less...prizes for the biggest sacks (unlimited fish number) and these fish be given to a community or establishment that will eat them.In a few years,one will see the benefit of this culling.
Life is not about the number of breaths we make,but the moments that take our breath away.
Reply
BFSA
#12
Precisely Smurf and thanks. If we want to ctach more and bigger fish, now and in the future, it is up to us!
We also fish a dam that has many hook & cooks from the local communities yet the avg size of the bass is over a kilo! And they are in good nick.
In the old days, bass management was as follows: Stock 10 or more fish and after 3 years don't put any back........Well, we have evolved since then and we are not so dof anymore, thanks to science and research. We haven't even touched the surface yet with regards to other selective removal methods such as electro fishing??

My biggest concern and FEAR with this strategy is that carp will gain an even bigger upper hand in the species mix which might just stuff up so called "specimen" angling. Nonetheless, the fish being removed are hungry so they can't be relying on young carp for sustenance.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#13
I am not so sure carp will suddenly become so dominant...You as anglers will have a pretty small impact on the overall bass population if you intend to cull a specified slot with artificial lure anglers...it would be best done with an electro shock method...this way you can remove barbel and carp as well as the specific sized bass,and this 'cull' will benefit all facets of angling,not just bass.I also think that the removal of some bass will not suddenly give the upper hand to carp because the carp forage is different to that of bass,in fact,it would be completely the opposite...the bigger bass will devour larger size carp ( :blue-biggrinSmile .ANY impoundment of water has to have critical management updates,and this (certainly for the bass angling fraternity) is obtainable after every season.The bass catches at,lets say again...Wriggleswade,are perfectly documented each year from club catches,Regionals,Nationals and the Amatola Classic...take out the top ten big fish and big bags and get an average for the balance...you might find the average bag weight ten or so years ago is now the big bag weight today...why ? The fish are there,hundreds of them,but it is those tons of dinks that are getting the available food source first,and that includes your lures !Thin this size of bass out,and you will NEVER succeed in removing all of them and more food is available to the larger fish...which will get bigger...No brainer.However,things must be monitored each season,and the Anglers do this,in order to determine if the practice is yielding the desired result...it will take years,but the trend will be evident within two years or so.And ,just as important,one has to know when to either stop the culling,adjust it or increase it...you need to have a certain population of juveniles to fill the gaps when those 8 kg monsters are found floating around dead !
Life is not about the number of breaths we make,but the moments that take our breath away.
Reply
#14
Ja Smurf - I'm looking foward to the day that the old bass start dying from old age so we can get a real indication of what it can produce.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
Reply
#15
Unfortunately you may never see this...a fish eagle will have it or the turtles will sort it out on the bottom,but it can happen.
Life is not about the number of breaths we make,but the moments that take our breath away.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)