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Cull - slot limit

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#16
Yep, be interesting to see how a fish eagle will pick up an 8 kilo piggie.....
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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BWG
#17
This is a thread about killing fish! This interesting observation came across my desk today:

"Sustained yield harvesting of all animal products is an ethically OK practice, even though it may affect the sensibilities of others, no matter how cute or cuddly the targeted animals may be.

One of the anti-killing of animal brigade’s universal tactics are as follows:

· To confuse “personal preference” with ethical issues. Ethics governs man’s interaction with fellow man, not man’s interaction with animals. Killing of animals only becomes an ethical issue when that affects man’s ability to survive, ie. if it endangers species. To test this, if killing of animals is “inhuman”, “cruel” or unethical, then so is animal killing of animals and must be stopped."


Food for thought!
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BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#18
No...Just Food ! Smile

I would be the last to have to be involved with the killing of bass,particularly large size bass,but there are times when common sense (and not the blinkered out look of bunny huggers) must prevail,for the betterment of the sport.There is a huge difference between blatant slaughter,as is experienced on some dams in Gauteng,and the removal of fish through a slot system so the remaining population develops into a better sporting specimen.Monitoring and control is key,and only fishermen (and ladies) are capable of that in this country.There is a Conservation Committee being formed right now in the Cape...a good thing for the sport.
Oh,by the way,an adult fish eagle would probably carry that 8 kg pig with one foot and some wing feathers missing..!
Life is not about the number of breaths we make,but the moments that take our breath away.
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#19
Well said Riprap. I spoke with Herman, host at Mofam river lodge on Sunday and he confirmed that even up until 2004 fisherman were taking bags of 4-6kg bass some 40-50 fish out of the river at a time. This is why we must make and enforce the change as best we can. I for one want my kids and their kids to enjoy the pleasures of this wonderful privilege of bass fishing.
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#20
Of all the "slot limit" fish culled over the weekend, only 6.06% had recently ingested food! They were in poor condition and as much as the "bunny huggers" say ag shame, I reckon we did these fish a favour!!
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#21
riprap Wrote:Of all the "slot limit" fish culled over the weekend, only 6.06% had recently ingested food! They were in poor condition and as much as the "bunny huggers" say ag shame, I reckon we did these fish a favour!!

Pardon me for not seeing the obvious here RipRap but what does this mean. Your findings, is it good or bad?
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BWG
#22
Jaki - our provincial clubs have, after extensive research, decided on a slot limit for a local dam under the following agreement, amongst other criteria:

REGULATIONS AND AGREEMENTS BY ALL PARTIES:

• The removal of fish is purely voluntary by anglers.
• Only fish of between 20 – 35cm in length may be removed and no initial limit on quantities is to be imposed.
• Fish may be removed during social and club outings only. This will not be permitted during the following SABAA events which are held at the dam:
Divisional outings
Provincial tournaments
National (Junior or Senior) tournaments
Annual Bass Classic
• Fish brought to the scale during a club event for weighing and which will be removed as per the agreement, must be declared to the weigh master in charge prior to being weighed and must be alive at time of weighing. The dead fish penalty rules as currently exists will thus remain in force.
• It is recommended that fish be dispatched of as humanely as possible. A blow to the top of the head with a solid object should suffice.
• As far as possible, all removed fish must be recorded in terms of size and quantity. These statistics must be reported to ............ by either sms on 0.........., e-mail to: .............................. or fax on ............................. He in turn will manage a database and report such to ............ on a monthly basis and whenever required to existing and current researchers undertaking work on ...................... dam.
• A representative of each club may be tasked with collecting this data and forwarding it on.
• Although results cannot be expected in the short term, the parties agree to review the process on an annual basis alternatively upon findings which may come to light.
• The initial process is expected to last between 1 (one) and 3 (three) years.
• No killing of fish for the sake of killing will be permitted. Where possible, the report will include how the fish are to be utilised, whether it be for personal use, donated to the needy or any other purpose.
• It is preferable that harvested fish are processed elsewhere other than .............. dam. However, should this occur it is agreed that no scales, intestines, heads etc. will be disposed of in the dam waters or in waste bins provided at the dam. Contravening this may result in disciplinary action being taken.


This was started over the last weekend and of course there is some reluctance by anglers to "kill" fish but we are working on changing the mindsets for the benefit of the fish and fisherman. All fish removed were treated with respect, kept on ice, cleaned and frozen and will be going to a local soup kitchen for the needy.
[Image: big_fish_eat_little_fish.jpg]
BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#23
Thanks Riprap, I am with the program now.

The findings of this practice over the next few years should be interesting.
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#24
Jaki, that's the thing boet, it takes a few years to see results from which we can then plan further strategies. Maybe by then there will be a formal inland fisheries policy..........we'll see!
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BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#25
We must also bear in mind that all animals have a natural cyclical abundance based on a multitude of natural factors. Just look currently how some waters are totally over stocked with bass whilst others have a declining population causing some concern amongst anglers and organisations. We have to live with the good and the bad but we have the power to intervene towards favourable results!
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BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#26
Selective Largemouth Bass Harvest: Advanced Strategies

By

Barry W. Smith

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BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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BWG
#27
Whilst this programme was on going, we applied for and were eventually granted a permit for cold tolerant Blue Kurper stocking from a reputable fish hatchery as a future fodder source for the bass, considering too the decline in water quality. These were purchased and stocked as per the permit conditions and we don't know how they have survived the winter temps (yet)!

I kept a few to grow out at home so as to study them and they have repeatedly bred and actually outgrown their tank. Quite interesting though is any disturbance with the females whilst they have eggs or fry in their mouths then they drop them in favour of their own survival. My son cleaned their tank this afternoon whilst they were placed in an equal temperature bath for 2 hrs and just look at all the excrement from them in such a short space of time - must be all the duckweed which we feed them!

No wonder they can keep a tank clean - in one end and out the other which will eventually kill them. The bigger & darker ones are the males and they are like horny black rhinos, I swear. Spring will be interesting......

[Image: Blue-Kurper-waste.jpg]
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#28
Good morning all.

Herewith an update to date:
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Of concern to me is that of the 23 fish culled this weekend, 11 were male and 12 were female. All the females barring one had mature roe (eggs) and quite possibly hadn’t spawned yet.
Only 17.4% of the fish had something in their stomachs and only 2 fish of the 4 had crabs. The other two had remnants of herring and one other female had a creature type bait on a 2’O hook in her guts with the point of the hook sticking through the stomach and sat quite happily in the body cavity with no ill effects it would appear, at this stage!
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On Sat evening it was raining herring at the quarry as they noisily surfaced to feed and bass were jumping all over them. It was basically dark already at this stage and I caught one on a white pearl fluke which was maargat and fell into the slot limit. Upon gutting it, there was nothing in it’s stomach......

I am not a scientist but a few things come to mind:
Are the females delaying spawning due to conditions being unsuitable, lack of food and thus nutrition or do the Florida’s spawn last?
The fact that so many young (read as small and not in age) fish are breeding seems to suggest that these fish are much older than we think.
Most anglers caught lots of dinks this weekend which means there is a fairly healthy population of younger recruitment fish in the system which probably are also battling with food issues.
We have yet to see if our legal stocking of cold tolerant Blue Kurper (O. mossambicus) from last year was successful and if it was we need to raise some funds to fill our quota with bigger specimens ASAP which by the way have been ordered way back.

Nonetheless, the reports and quality of big fish over the festive season is encouraging and it would be safe to say that the fishery is not receding. A fish a cast in the right conditions might suggest that we are still very overstocked with bass and some pictures I’ve seen of Carp recently seem to indicate that they are not that healthy with many having lesions which is an indicator of stress in the population. The Carp Classic at the end of Jan will give more clarity here as hundreds of carp will be removed.

That’s all for now. Discuss this at your club meets to take further.

Regards.
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BIG FISH EAT LITTLE FISH....
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#29
Chaps, do yourselves a favour and click on this pic to enlarge and read what the authorities are doing at Lake Istokpoga in Florida in the US.
Photo courtesy of Dr Olaf Weyl.



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#30
Some feedback from the carp classic reveals that some 3 tons of carp were removed from the system (not specimen fish....). On the right morning when the carp surface, one could view more tonnage than this surfacing in one small bay on it's own and considering a 1 000 ha surface area, it would be logical, ethical and fair to say that just perhaps we are doing the right thing with harvesting and which begs the question: To all doomsayers of the fish resources, what are you doing to save your fish from dying a slow agonising death from starvation??
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